Zoom H1 Handy Recorder

Continue Shopping or Checkout

Availability: Ordered In Upon Purchase


Category: -EFP-&-Broadcast-Portable-Recorder-Accessories, Pro-Audio-ENG


Book a Demonstration
Request Commercial Quantities
Request a Price Match

  • X/Y Stereo Mic
  • Records WAV and MP3 up to 24-bit/96kHz
  • Records to microSD/SDHC
  • 3.5mm I/O
  • High-Speed USB 2.0 Connectivity
  • Backlit LCD Display
  • Built-In Speaker
  • Uses 1 AA Battery
  • Threaded Tripod Mount Socket

The H1 Mic/Line Input is a stereo ?" mini phone jack that can accept two mic- and/or line-level signals. Condenser microphones requiring Plug-In Power (2.5 volts) can be connected to this jack.

The H1 Line/Headphones Output is a stereo ?" phone jack with a dedicated volume control. Headphones can be connected here for private monitoring. There's also a built-in speaker on the back panel for fast monophonic monitoring of the recorded signal without the need to make any connections.

The H1's USB port provides a digital output of the stereo mix and allows data to be sent to and from your computer. From there, it can be imported into editing software such as the supplied WaveLab LE.  It also allows the H1 to be used as a 2-in/2-out audio interface and USB microphone, as well as a microSD card reader.

Auto Level and low cut filter

The H1's Auto Level function sets input gain automatically to prevent

overload and distortion. Alternatively, input level can be set manually.

The H1 also provides a built-in low cut filter for the elimination of pops,

wind noise, blowing, and other kinds of low frequency rumble.

The H1 records audio in two different basic file types: WAV and MP3. The main difference between the two is that WAV files are uncompressed; that is, they contain all the recorded signal without any data being removed. The WAV files recorded by the H1 can be either 16- or 24-bit, with sampling rates of 44.1, 48, or 96kHz, and are automatically time-stamped, making them Broadcast Wave Format (BWF) compliant—especially important when recording audio for video since it allows for precise synchronization in post-production.

MP3 recordings are compressed, which means that some unnecessary data is removed prior to storage, making them much smaller than WAV files, and thus much easier to upload and download. Some MP3 files exhibit a slight loss of audio fidelity as compared with the original signal; however, this is not noticeable in all circumstances.

 

Related Items